Asbestos Advice Helpline
An aggressive and fatal form of cancer for which there is currently no cure. It can be caused by breathing in as little as one fibre of asbestos.
Asbestos exposure can cause cancerous tumours to develop in the lungs, resulting in coughing, phlegm and loss of appetite.
Caused by exposure to large amounts of asbestos, Asbestosis causes heavy coughing and wheezing as the ability to supply oxygen is impaired.
Dust trapped in the lining of the lungs (the pleura) can cause it to thicken, creating a tightening of the chest and difficulty breathing.

Asbestos-related Diseases

Those who are suffering from an asbestos related disease will won’t to know what options are available to them and if/how they should make a claim for compensation.

Statistics show that out of all men over 40 in the UK, 1% of them have been affected by asbestos and asbestos related diseases.

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral which is still mined in some parts of the world. It is made up of incredibly small fibres which can be very damaging to the human body when inhaled. 2 million asbestos fibres can fit on the head of a pin and they can cause fatal and disabling diseases such as Mesothelioma, Asbestosis, Lung Cancer and Pleural Thickening.

Asbestos was widely used before its ban due to its useful qualities. It is resistant to flames, a good insulator and resistant to acid. Unfortunately, as it was widely used, it put a lot of workers at risk across a variety of industries.

It can take anything up to 40 years or more for the symptoms of conditions such as mesothelioma and asbestosis to emerge, with the original asbestos exposure often many years previously. Even if you no longer work for the employer who may have caused you to become exposed to asbestos fibres or if they have gone out of business, you can still make a claim for compensation.

Whether you have been diagnosed with an asbestos related disease and are looking for further information and support, please remember that we are here to help.


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